Faith

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Month of Prayer, Week 5: The power of the Church

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As our Month of Prayer comes to a close, we would like to thank Megan Roberts for all her help on this blog! Read Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, and Week 4 posts here on how we can help and pray for our city.

Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.” –James 1:27

The Church is the institution God uses to show who His people are and a crucial part of how the love of God is demonstrated to a hurting world. The Church creates disciples who teach and obey Christ, and here, in James 1:27, we find exactly what kind of obedience God is after.

Praise God for the 15 churches who are currently partnering with DC127 and for the ways that we have seen God move through these churches to care for the vulnerable in the city.

This week we are praying for the churches who have already started partnering with DC127 and for more churches to join in their efforts. DC127 recognizes the power of the Church and believes that, if united, the Church could tangibly change the way things operate for children and families in the District.

This week will you prayer that the churches of DC will:

  • Care for children in foster care, single mothers, and other vulnerable families in our city in part by bringing new churches into the DC127 movement
  • Make disciples who open their homes and create cultures in their community where people who have been marginalized are welcomed and accepted
  • Find favor with the people of this city, including governing officials, that the work of DC127 might be more easily accomplished
  • Support those families among them seeking to host, foster, or adopt, and those that have fostered or adopted already

Here are some resources to learn more:

Watch an 8-minute video on why caring for children in foster care is the responsibility of the church.

Hear our keynote speaker from One City. One Hope 2014 cast a vision for what could happen in Washington, DC when the churches unite.

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Month of Prayer, Week 3: Keeping Families Together

Posted by | Faith, Foster Care and Adoption, Safe Families for Children, Supporting Families, Uncategorized | No Comments

 

“He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away. And he who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” – Revelation 21:4

“For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, 15 from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named, 16 that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being” – Ephesians 3:14-16

Keeping Families Together 

God created the family in His image, and what hurts the family hurts God. From Genesis to Revelation, we see the ways that God designed the family to be a place of human flourishing.

Unfortunately, there are serious obstacles facing the unity of families today. Poverty and hunger make it difficult for many parents to adequately care for their children, and over 17,000 DC families accepted TANF assistance in 2014. This and other factors drive up the number of children in group homes – situations that can cost up to ten times more to raise each child in then it would cost to raise them in a single-family home.

Despite these challenges, God offers hope. In Revelation, He tells John that He is preparing a kingdom where all things will be made new – a kingdom unaffected by poverty, hunger, sickness, or death. A kingdom formed of one, insoluble, family.

This week, will you join us in praying:

  • That we – the church in DC – would be able to help prevent the breakup of families by foster care, and shine a beam of that perfect kingdom into a very broken world.
  • That parents struggling to care for their children would have access the resources needed to keep their children happy and healthy, and their families together.
  • That there will be an increase in affordable housing in the District, and that the thousands of families struggling to pay rent or find a safe place to live will get the help they need. Pray also for protection and an increase in the valuable benefits DC families need to survive.
  • That more volunteers will step up to care for struggling families. Pray for more Host Homes to temporarily care for children to give parents space to strengthen their families, and for an increase in other Safe Families volunteer roles so that parents get the help they need.
  • That marriages in impoverished communities would strengthen, that husbands and wives would care for each other, and that both would care for the children in their charge.
  • That single parents in the District will get be connected to a supportive community. Pray especially for single parents who are living in poverty and struggling to care for their children and strengthen their family alone.
  • That children put into foster care would be able to be reunited with their families. Pray that while children are in care they would be able to maintain a connection with their parents and families. Pray for foster parents to know how to support and strengthen those bonds.

Thank you for praying with us!

Interested in finding more ways of helping your city?

Here are resources to help you get more involved:

Watch a 4-minute story from a foster dad on how God taught him the importance of loving a child’s biological family.

And here’s a 7-minute video from the Executive Director the national Safe Families for Children network on why prevention work is so important.

Thank you Megan Roberts for her help on this blog!

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Month of Prayer, Week 2: For children in foster care and the families caring for them

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Last week, we prayed for our city, asking that the church steps up for vulnerable children and families. This week, join us in praying for the children in foster care and the families who care for them. Thanks to DC127 Church Coordinator Megan Roberts for writing the blog!

For the children in foster care and those caring for them:

In DC alone, around 1,000 children and teens are living in foster care and over 100 of these children need to be adopted. DC is also currently facing a shortage of foster homes to care for these children.

In DC, 95% of children in the foster care system are African American, compared to 24% nationally, reflecting incredible disproportionality. As we pray for foster care in DC, let’s not forget we must also pray and advocate for racial justice in the systems that affect these children’s lives.

In Matthew 18, as Jesus’ disciples ask him who the greatest in the Kingdom is. Jesus uses a child to remind us that in heaven, those who humble themselves, not those who seek exultation, will be considered the greatest. He makes this bold declaration:

“Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me”

This week, will you join us in praying for:

  • Families currently fostering or in the licensing process: Pray that they would find the resources they need to foster or adopt and care for children well. Pray that God continually provides the strength, support, and resources they need to thrive. Pray that churches would be strong sources of support for families.
  • 
The children in foster care: Pray that each child would receive the comfort of Christ, and that their stay in foster care will be short. Pray that children will be reunified with their families, and for the children who need to be adopted, pray that an adoptive home is found quickly.
  • New families created through adoption and foster care: Pray that God will bind them together and they would be full of Christ-like love, joy, and peace.
  • More foster and adoptive homes: Pray for more people to step up to foster and adopt from foster care until there are enough homes for every child, and pray that the churches of Washington, DC will be able to support these families.
  • For justice in the systems surrounding foster care: Pray for other government systems to uplift and care for the poor.

Thank you for praying with us!

Interested in finding more ways of helping your city?

Here are resources to help you get more involved:

 

Watch a powerful 4-minute video from performance poet Shaun Welcome, sharing stories of children in foster care:

 

Watch four successful college graduates talk about their lives post foster care and the advice they have for current kids in the foster care system:

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Month of Prayer, Week 1: Praying for our City

Posted by | Blog, Faith, Foster Care and Adoption, Safe Families for Children | No Comments

DC127 is a movement of churches that believes God has called us to care for children in foster care and children at-risk of entering care. We also believe that we won’t be able to do any of this unless we rely on God.

Like last year, we’re going to mark the month of February as a month of prayer. We’ll be posting blogs each Wednesday that cover a different topic and invite you to pray with us for our city, kids in or at-risk of foster care, their families and the families who care for them, and for churches to respond in love and action. You can sign up here to get a reminder when the blog is posted. We also want to thank our amazing Church Coordinator, Megan Roberts, for writing these posts.

Praying for our City

“Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.” James 1:27

1,500 children are at risk of entering foster care and receiving in-home services in Washington, DC. Around 1,000 children are currently in foster care. Nationally, over 415,000 children are in foster care, and over 110,000 of those children are waiting to be adopted.

The numbers are staggering. These statistics paint a dire picture for the most vulnerable in our city- those children at risk of losing a family, those mothers raising children by themselves in precarious circumstances.  As Christians, we are called to look after the vulnerable and keep ourselves from being polluted by the world. We live in a fallen world with broken cities where families are separated or unable able to provide for their needs. While we live in a fallen world, we know we are called to a higher purpose: to follow a God that is merciful and just who cares for the vulnerable and calls us to follow Him.

This week, will you pray with us for:

  • Believers in our city and around the world: Pray we will look after those who are vulnerable and advocate for the marginalized in our cities.
  •  Those who are in distress in Washington, DC: There are 1,491 homeless families in DC, and many more living in poverty and crisis. Pray God would comfort each of them and provide relief. Pray that our city’s leaders will represent them and affect change on their behalf. Pray for an increase in jobs and resources available to these families to help them stabilize their families.
  • The professionals who serve in social services in DC: Serving in social services can mean long, hard and emotional days. Pray that these workers will get rest and relief, and pray that the organizations and systems they work in will operate to the benefit of the vulnerable in our city.
  •  Churches: Pray churches would be a light in a broken world and at the forefront of caring for those in need. Pray for increased partnership between churches and city agencies. Pray that social workers can come to rely on churches to care for those in need and to help them as they serve our city.

Thank you for praying with us!

Interested in finding more ways of helping your city?

Here are resources to help you get more involved:

 

Hear our keynote speaker from One City. One Hope. 2014 cast a vision for what could happen in Washington, D.C. when the churches unite:

 

Hear from Dr. Sharen Ford on why the government needs the church to cross the aisle, learn about child welfare system, and serve children in foster care:

 

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Where do hope, joy, peace, and love fit in places of pain?

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Hope. Joy. Peace. Love.

We talk about these four words a lot during the Christmas and Advent season. While they absolutely contribute to the warm, fuzzy, Christmas-movie feelings I love to have, they also read as a challenge. In the context of Christ’s birth and where we find ourselves as God’s people, it’s been helpful for me to remember just how radical these words really are.stocksnap_96rtp23cu4

DC127 exists because there are children spending this Christmas season (and the months after it) without a family or away from their home. We exist because there are parents struggling to keep their children out of foster care in the face of poverty, homelessness, and crisis. We exist because in the past two weeks alone, we’ve gotten calls from 6 single moms who are struggling to keep their children home – moms who love their children, but can’t do this alone.

When I think about the challenges facing these mothers, their children, and the children in DC’s foster care system, having hope, feeling joy and love, and being at peace is hard. Where do these four simple words fit in places of brokenness, systemic injustice, and so much pain?

This is when these words become radical, because they ask you to go against everything you see in front of you. We have to make an active choice to believe them. The Advent season is a reminder that Christ’s birth and the promise He brings is the reason for our hope, joy, peace, and love.

Maybe we should change it: Active Hope. Active Joy. Active Peace. Active Love.

Despite the pain and brokenness we see, perhaps:
Active hope is a call to action, believing things will change and staying discontent with the status quo.
Active joy is not letting despair win out, even when we feel stuck and without a path.
Active peace remembers that we serve a God bigger than the injustice we see.
Active love is doing the hard work of loving our neighbor despite differences, and carrying their burdens not in charity but in true relationship.

This isn’t always easy to remember, but as I think about the last year with DC127, I think about the many people in our network who demonstrate what it means to live out active hope, joy, love, and peace.

I think about the foster parents who stepped out not only to care for a child, but to love his mother and siblings as well. I think about the team who wrapped around a single mom of four, ensuring she had support and also bringing her into their church community and showing her the peace of Christ.stocksnap_76kvxq6tjy

I think about the ways many of you have supported DC127’s families through babysitting, donating diapers, or bringing joy through a meal:

  • the babysitter who spent the night at a foster home to give them some sleep,
  • the Host Home who picked up a child late at night after a house fire,
  • the couple who generously sent diapers, wipes, and clothes all across the city to support foster and host homes.

I think about each of you who have invested financially in DC127, and who have invested in the future hope of a city where no child waits for a home.

There are too many stories to list here. Thank you for the ways you’ve loved and shown peace to DC this year. I pray as you go through the Advent season you see the active hope, joy, love, and peace of Christ in your life.

Merry Christmas!

-Chelsea Geyer

DC127 Executive Director

Giving Thanks: Finding the Blessings in the Challenges of Serving Others

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By: Amy Hammond

fullsizerenderThanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday.

Don’t get me wrong: I love celebrating the birth of our Savior and the renewing of faith that it brings each December… as well as the promise of redemption that comes alongside Easter Sunday. But Thanksgiving, to me, is a reminder to celebrate one of the most important tenets of walking in a life of faith: gratitude.

I have nice clothes, a safe home and a dependable car. I’ve been blessed with a devoted husband, a loving family and a supportive church community. These are all gifts I thank God regularly for giving me.

But what about my calling—my ministry? Am I thankful for the acts of service God has called me to?

As a foster mother, I’ll be the first to confirm that the things He asks of us are not always easy. From blow-torching lead paint off the walls in preparation for getting our license, to the equally fiery battle faced every day in advocating for the kids I serve—this is far from an easy job.

Particularly when it is time to let go.

My husband and I had a little boy placed with us in July at just a few weeks old. He was so tiny… and so sick. We spent many sleepless nights trying to understand this little one’s needs. One very specific feeding protocol and doses of medication later, this tiny guy has blossomed into a strong, happy and healthy six-month-old. He lights up when we walk into a room, and snuggles against our chests when he’s ready to sleep. As young as he is, he has grown to understand that he can trust us to take care of him. People who are not his family. People who—as is the case for many foster children—he might never have seen again once home with his family.

img_5468That’s why, as hard as we’ve worked to get to this point with this little human, we’ve worked twice as hard to show the same love toward his family, too. It started with letters and baked goods on visitation days, and has transformed into something much more. We’ve been invited to celebrate birthdays and graduations. A new house. And soon, even in the midst of loss we are bound to feel, we will also celebrate the reunion of this child we have come to adore with his wonderful mother.

Don’t get me wrong: Relationship is messy. It has meant forging new territory, all while trusting that the promptings we hear come from God. We are following where He is leading us in loving on this family, even when it might feel foreign to everyone involved.

Throughout this journey, people have shown us gratitude. They thank us constantly for what we do, for the sacrifice we must be willing to make. But the truth is, we don’t have to do this… we get to do this.

Matthew 20:28 says, “Even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” I have served this baby boy and his family, not for earthly recognition or eternal reward, but because this is not my life. It is His breath in my lungs, so I live God’s gift in a way that honors the One who gave it. Serving His children is such a blessing to me, and a calling I am incredibly thankful for.

There are moments in serving when you know unequivocally that God walks alongside you. His love for us is evident in the blessings that overwhelm by their magnitude, those bigger than you ever thought to pray for.family-pic

Two weeks ago this beautiful little one’s strong and selfless mother asked us to be his godparents.

Even as I was mourning the end of this season, God was still writing the story.

There’s a question my church asks often: Are you putting a period where God has put a comma? With this holiday quickly approaching, I beg you to pray about the story He’s writing for you right now. Let’s look at the struggle with gratitude, as this is the gorgeous mess He’s using to mold us. Let’s give thanks that He is the savior of the world, and He carries that world—and all of us, so precious in His sight—within His capable hands.

Amy is a foster parent in Washington, DC. She and her husband, Adam, have cared for 4 children in foster care over the last year. 

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How a #FAIL taught me a lot about the world

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By Jessica Smith, Safe Families for Children Manager

I grew up in a small farming community in the midwest. There was zero diversity. Our village (yes, it was so small they called it a village) was made up of white, middle class Christians. I was so excited to leave and attend college in a city. On my first day, eager to make friends, I met Mike, an African American man from Detroit. Me, trying to find any connection I could, spotted a round, flat, bristle-filled brush sitting on his desk. “You have horses, too!” I exclaimed with joy (the brush looked exactly like the one I used on my horses back home). He gave me a funny look and hesitantly told me that’s what he used on his hair. I was so embarrassed. #FAIL

IMG_2591Maybe you have a story like this (most of us do- it’s nothing to be ashamed of). In a world with so many cultures, there are bound to be times where our differences collide. If you’re involved with DC127, you’re likely building a relationship with someone or caring for a child who has a different background than you. And that can be scary. But if we truly want to build relationships that cross bridges, and care for children and families well, we must be willing to learn about their culture and become more aware of how different people live life.

There’s a phrase for this: Cultural humility. Cultural humility is about being aware and appreciating where you come from and how that has shaped your perception of the world.
I can’t change where I grew up or what brushes I used for my horse, but I can recognize how my experiences shaped the way I view the world and created the bias I carry around.  Cultural humility means I am aware of how I view the world, but I also take steps to learn about other people’s views and value these differences.

Cultural humility demands openness. We have to admit that we cannot, and will not, ever know everything about the world. We have to be willing to take ourselves out of positions of power and privilege and admit that we don’t know how a parent feels, and we don’t know what they are going through.  Openness allows us to learn from the people we’re walking with, which in turn creates stronger and longer lasting relationships.

Openness allows us to learn from the people we’re walking with, which in turn creates stronger, longer lasting relationships.

So how can we practice the art of cultural humility in our relationships with children and families?

  1. Listen. Really listen to someone’s story. Make sure you’re not just listening to think of solutions. Ask questions, summarize, and reflect on what the person said.
  2.  If you don’t know something about a person, don’t make assumptions. We may never know someone’s whole story. But when we make assumptions, we’re robbing someone of sharing their story with us from their perspective. IMG_2494 (1)There’s an especially high risk of us assuming things about a family because they are involved with Safe Families or foster care.
  3. Get outside of your comfort zone. Try thinking of a situation through someone else’s view. Ask a person where they feel comfortable meeting or eating. For example, your favorite indie coffee shop might make someone else incredibly uncomfortable. What are their favorite places? Maybe they can teach you something new about the city?

When we sign up to walk with a parent or care for a child, we’re not signing up to change or save someone. We’re entering into a relationship amongst equals where we can join together and get through a tough time. We’re modeling love, acceptance, and reliability. We can’t become more focused on fixing the situation, than loving the person and their family. Our relationship with parents and families in crisis must first be an equal relationship between two humans, and not a transaction of help. But in order to achieve this we must respect their culture and humbly admit that we don’t know everything about it.

Month of Prayer, Week 4: For the People of God

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We’re marking February as a month of prayer (read more about why this is important here). Join us each week as we pray for a different aspect of the child welfare system and our call to care for children and families. You can read last week’s post here.

In 2012, a small group of people at The District Church were praying about how they could get involved in caring for kids in foster care. Through prayer and investment from other local churches, DC127 was created. The reach of DC127 would not be possible without the efforts of our local churches. We have 10 partner churches, have recruited 23 Host Homes, are serving 10 foster families, and have over 100 volunteers. While we are thankful for the favor we have had so far, the need is still great. There are over 1,100 children in DC’s foster care system, and even more children are at-risk of entering foster care. This week, will you join with us to pray for churches to answer God’s call, care for children and families, and demonstrate the love of Christ to a hurting city?

This week, will you pray with us for:

  • Churches already involved: Thank God for the pastors, deacons, volunteers, and Church Coordinators already helping advance the mission of DC127 in their own communities. Pray that they would continue to sustain their efforts.
  • Future churches working with DC127: Pray that God would continue to call pastors and congregations to labor alongside DC127, and for churches to specifically join us in creating Safe Families teams and supporting parents choosing to adopt or create foster homes. Pray for churches that represent all demographics to join and work together for our city.
  • Church Coordinators: Our Church Coordinators make DC127’s work possible. Thank God for existing volunteer coordinators, who organize and run DC127’s ministry in their churches. Pray that God would continue to grow them and grant them favor as they work with their pastors and congregations to rally support and organize for DC127.
  • Church communities: Pray that the communities around our churches would take note of the work they are doing and respond not only with an interest in the work they do with the foster system, but with open hearts to the Gospel.

Thank you for praying with us!

And we’d like to say a special thank you to Megan Roberts from Restoration Church who wrote the blog for this month. She made these blogs happen. Thank you, Megan!

 

Here are some resources to learn more:

Watch our friend Jason Weber talk about why we all need to bring our gifts, talents, and skills to the table in order to make something awesome happen.

 

Hear our keynote speaker from One City. One Hope 2014 cast a vision for what could happen in Washington, DC when the churches unite:

Month of Prayer, Week 3: For Every Child Welfare Professional

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We’re marking February as a month of prayer (read more about why this is important here). Join us each week as we pray for a different aspect of the child welfare system and our call to care for children and families. You can read last week’s post here.

The foster care system in our city is made up of hundreds of social workers, police officers, court officers, counselors, and other government and service providers. This week, we are praying for those who have chosen to make a career out of caring for children and ensuring they have a safe place to live and thrive. And if you’re one of these people, we are grateful for you and your work!

For this week, we talked to a local DC social worker about the challenges she faces and what she needs from her community. Here’s what she had to say:

“A few weeks ago, I met someone and we we were small talking. He asked my husband and I both what we do and he was happy to chat with my husband about the law. And then he awkwardly turned to me with the oh-too-familiar-sympathetic-head-nod and said,’Wow, I don’t know how do you what you do,’ and asked, ‘How do you do it?’ I paused, truly caught in the depth of the suffering I spend all day wading through, and took a moment before laughing awkwardly and shrugging, unable to come up with anything to say. The guy looked at me again and said, ‘What does social work do to you? My sister has been a social worker for 6 years and she gets that same vacant look in her eye when you ask her about it.’

In the “ReMoved” video, pay attention to the social workers face at 4:16, 5:04. I know that look. The resignation, the punched-in-the-gut, I’m trying not to cry because I have to be strong, but I’ve also built a wall to protect myself so it’s not hurting as much as it will hurt when I’m in the car on the way home.

But I have to do what I do. I have to jump in, I have to fight, I don’t have a choice. As a firefighter runs into the burning building, I dive into the brokenness and hurt of a family ripped apart, of innocence torn away, of the system that is so clogged down and distorted that it does the exact opposite of what it was intended to do. And while I go in willingly, sometimes I get stuck there. The darkness swallows me, I give too much of my heart away, and I am too weary to climb out. My work invades my dreams and steals my sleep. My to-do list grows faster than I can keep up with, and every phone call brings more bad news. And yet, I must press on. I must give a voice to the children and families who are overlooked, forgotten, undeserved.

Being a social worker in DC, the contradictions and contrast of the Capital city are staggering. I gaze at the iconic skyline as I drive to homes without running water. I walk past museums and federal buildings to the hollow halls of the courthouse where lives are mutilated more often than they are healed. I spend the day working with a child whose mother has abandoned her, and who has been in eight foster homes in the past year, and then I go to happy hour where it’s all about who you know and what you do, and the ‘I’m a social worker’ line gets that awkward silence and a quick dodge out of the conversation. Occasionally someone will do that familiar, sympathetic nod and say, ‘Wow, that’s hard work, I could never do it.’ I don’t want sympathy, I don’t want pity or misunderstanding or ignorance. What I want is for these people to understand if they saw the world I did, they would have no choice but to do the work.. And, I don’t need people to remind me how hard the work I do is — I am fully aware of that. I don’t need people to tell me I’m a saint — I know how often I fail my clients. What I do need is someone to smile at me, to encourage me, to not shy away from the hard places and to say, ‘What you’re doing is important and it matters. I’m so glad you’re there, keep up the good work.’ I probably won’t believe it at the time, but it might seep in, and in the cold moments of sleeplessness, or the vulnerable moments of a long run, maybe it would sneak back up on me as a glimmer of hope in the midst of despair.”

This week, will you pray with us for:

  • Social workers and other front-line workers: Pray that they would do their jobs with patience, empathy, and wisdom. Pray that God would help them endure through difficult days, equip them as they face new challenges, and encourage them as they work with families and children who in tough situations.
  • Government employees: Pray that they would work with children’s needs first and foremost in their minds, and that the people of DC would have wisdom in choosing local government leaders. Pray that each government worker would be given the resources needed to protect vulnerable children in our city, and strengthened as they deal with hard situations.
  • Child and Families Services Agency (CFSA): CFSA is the government agency that oversees DC’s foster care system. Pray that each employee there would be moved by compassion for the children and families they serve. Pray for Director Raymond Davidson as he leads CFSA and pray for wisdom as he makes decisions and policies that affect so many. Pray for encouragement and strength for the Deputy Directors, supervisors, assistants, and each employee who makes CFSA run.
  • Service providers and non-profits: There are many private non-profit organizations serving kids and families in DC. These groups range from foster care agencies, to mentor organizations, to advocacy groups. Thank God and pray for each citizen serving DC’s children. Pray that God would sustain them as they not only do the hard work of serving children, but also run organizations and find funding. As these groups address gaps in the foster care system, prayer that they get the resources they need, whether that’s funding or volunteers.
  • Police, EMS, and first responders: Pray that they would work unto the Lord, protecting and helping families and children in crisis, and ensuring that children would get the care they need. Pray for their safety and for wisdom as they make quick decisions in tense situations.

Here are some resources to learn more about how government agencies, social workers, and the church interact:

Listen to Dr. Deb Shropshire talk about her powerful experiences as a pediatrician called to the child welfare system and how she remember’s God’s promise amidst so much brokenness:

Hear from Dr. Sharon Ford on why the government needs the church to cross the aisle, learn about the child welfare system, and serve children in foster care:

 

Thank you to Megan Roberts for her help with this post!

Month of Prayer, Week 2: Building New Families

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We’re marking February as a month of prayer (read more about why this is important here). Join us each week as we pray for a different aspect of the child welfare system and our call to care for children and families. You can read last week’s post here

When children in foster care aren’t able to return to their family, adoption becomes the new goal. In the US, there are currently 415,000 children living in foster care without the stability of a permanent home. Of those children, over 101,000 are waiting to be adopted, and 32% of them will wait three years or more before they are adopted. Safe and loving foster homes are essential for each child in foster care during their time of transition.

The promise of adoption is central to God’s love for us (Ephesians 1:5). Over and over we are told how much we are loved as children of God adopted into the family of God. We also see verse after verse about God’s call to care for children, for the orphans, for the vulnerable, and we are told that God places the lonely in families. Just as we were lonely and God adopted us into his family, this week will you pray for the children across our country who need to be placed in families?

 This week will you pray with us for:

  • Children who need to be adopted and are unsure of their future: Pray that each child waiting for a stable and permanent home would experience peace and calm. Pray specifically for older youth, who often wait longer for homes, and for children living with disabilities, that they would each find a family that can care for them. Pray that the 552 teens and young adults (53% of all kids in DC foster care) in DC’s foster care system would receive the support, mentors, and families they need.
  • Foster parents who are caring for children for the long term: Pray for sustained encouragement and energy to provide a safe home for children to thrive however long the child is with them. Pray for them as they navigate a complicated system, keep up training hours, and ensure the child is receiving the care he/she needs.
  • Adoptive families: Pray for them as they create bonds with their children. Pray that as a family they would create memories and stories together and become one unit. Pray for wisdom as these parents navigate relationships with the children’s birth families and as they work to meet the specific needs of their children.
  • More adoptive homes: Pray for more homes to hear and listen to call to adopt children from foster care. Pray specifically for more homes to adopt older youth and kids with various needs. Pray for these homes as they go through what can be a difficult licensing process and for them to have patience and support from their community as they start this journey.
  • For Adoption Recruiters: Pray for them as they search for homes for specific children. Pray that the recruiters would divinely meet the right people, attend the right events, and have wisdom as they make potential adoptive matches.

Here are some resources and ways you can be involved:

Watch a powerful 4-minute video from performance poet Shaun Welcome, sharing stories of children in foster care:

FMU – Welcome – Spoken Word Clip from Christian Alliance for Orphans on Vimeo.

Watch an 8-minute video on why caring for children in foster care is the responsibility of the church:

 

 

Thank you to Megan Roberts for her help on this blog!

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