DC127 is truly a group effort.

While we can’t list everyone here, there are many people that have dedicated time, energy, and talents to make our work possible.
We recognize that we would not exist without these volunteers and consider them a core part of the DC127 team.


Chelsea Geyer

Chelsea Geyer

Executive Director

Chelsea grew up in Aurora, Colorado (and she’s pretty proud of that). She learned about foster care at an early age when she gained three siblings from foster care and adoption. Throughout college, she worked with a center for vulnerable children in Swaziland, and saw how important a family and support network is in the life of a child. She graduated from Nyack College in New York with a degree in English, and then moved to Washington, DC to continue her work with The Resolve LRA Crisis Initiative on their LRA Crisis Tracker, a map and database that tracked and analyzed the movements and child abductions of a rebel army in Central Africa. She then moved on to launch DC127 in 2013, and considers it an honor to be on this team. Outside of DC127, On any given day, you might find her reading a book, trying to hike up a mountain, catching up on Survivor or The Walking Dead, or just enjoying beautiful Washington, DC.

Jessica Smith

Jessica Smith

Safe Families for Children Manager

Jessica came to Washington, DC determined to make long-lasting changes for the country's most vulnerable populations by reforming policy and advocating with communities for sustainable change. While studying Social Work at Western Michigan University, she interned at Bethany Christian Services as a Foster Care Case Manager and helped start a Safe Families for Children movement. She obtained her Master's in Social Work from the University of Michigan where she studied Social Policy and Evaluation with Communities and Social Systems. Jessica moved to DC for her final semester and worked at Generations United, a policy advocacy organization. She decided to stay after graduation and was so excited to learn about Safe Families for Children DC. Jessica is also a Ward 1 Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner and loves helping her community get more involved in local politics.

 
Raessa Singh

Raessa Singh

Family Support Coordinator

Raessa grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska and began her career in social work as an employment specialist for adults with developmental disabilities. Motivated by a passion to work with vulnerable populations, Raessa moved to Boston in 2011 to attend Boston University and then graduated with masters degrees in social work and public health. Through social work internships at Creighton University Medical Center and World Vision International, Raessa saw how families and communities play a vital role in ensuring children experience healthy outcomes. Raessa moved to DC in 2014 and began working at PATH on a malaria vaccine project and also began volunteering at DC127. As a volunteer, she gained a renewed passion for mobilizing communities to address the needs of vulnerable children and families and finds it an honor to now be on staff at DC127. Raessa values time with her family and friends and loves exploring DC.

 

Aaron and Amy Graham

Aaron and Amy Graham

Founders of DC127 and Pastors at The District Church

What started in their home just a few years ago has now grown into a church reaching hundreds and hundreds of people in two locations in our nations capital. They first fostered a teenage boy in Boston and are now parents to Elijah and Natalie who are both adopted from South Carolina. Before working at The District Church Amy served as a foster care social worker in DC. She has degrees from Boston University’s School of Social Work and Golden Gate Theological Seminary. Aaron has a background in community organizing around issues of poverty and injustice, and has a masters in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School and a doctorate in missiology from Fuller Theological Seminary. Aaron and Amy have a heart to see churches in DC unite and dream of the day when families are waiting for children, rather than there being children waiting for families.